Posts under category: News

Saporous Suppers

Posted on January 27th, 2014 · By admin

London’s best vegan supper club is back! In the form of Saporous Suppers and will be held on 7th February at 7:30PM in Dalston. The location will remain a secret to all but those attending.

Some of you may remember the monthly supper club series we ran two years ago at a café in Drummond Street. Sadly this collaboration ended when the proprietors decided to renovate the space into a one bedroom flat.

Supperclub Vegan Peasant

Supperclub Vegan Peasant

To start we would like to run these events monthly, but if there is enough demand we we’d like to make them weekly.

This month’s menu has a fusion theme with ingredients from Italian, Central American and Cuban. Some times we focus on a particular country, but who’s to say where one food tradition ends and another begins. With every menu that we create our aim is to attentively cater to your taste buds by making sure you experience a balanced meal that’s full of flavour.

Start time is 7.30pm and Tickets are £35 each. Ticket numbers are limited and are on a first come first served basis and will not be available on the night. Booking closes three days before the event date. Be sure to book early.

Eventbrite - Saporous Suppers

Saporous Supper Menu

Saporous Supper Menu

 

Have a query about this event? Contact diana@veganpeasantcatering.com

 

About Vegan Peasant Catering

We are a London-based start-up event catering company. Our goal is to bring sustainable make from scratch food to your table. We specialize in 100 plant-based cuisine, which is organic where possible, local, fair-trade and vegan. Because we specialize in pure vegetarian foods we can offer you real choices and not just an option. We pride ourselves on being able to please vegans, vegetarians, non-vegetarians and flexitarians too.

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Saporous Suppers

Posted on January 10th, 2014 · By admin

If you tried to book tickets earlier and weren’t able to because the link wasn’t working it is working now.

We still have 6 tickets available.

If you are still keen on attending book now.

A New Year for a new supper!

We are kick-starting the new year with the launch of Saporous Suppers. The first supper takes place on the last Saturday of the month. And if all goes well might become a twice monthly event in the future. We’ve been meaning to start a new dinner series for some time now. So we hope you’ll join us.

The three-course menu can be seen below. You can book tickets and find out more on the eventbrite page.

http://saporoussuppers.eventbrite.com/

Saporous Supper Menu

Saporous Supper Menu

 

 

 

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Vegan Peasant Round up for 2013

Posted on January 5th, 2014 · By admin

Welcome to our Vegan Peasant Round up for 2013. 2013 maybe the best vegan year yet so 2014 can only get better with talk of the first vegan supermarket chain Veganz coming to London, mainstream media addressing unsustainable meat consumption and the veggie curious eating more plant-based meals. I can’t wait to see what happens in 2014. Enjoy!

Kimchi Fried Rice

Kimchi Fried Rice

Korean Food

Korean food maybe a trend for some that’s set to take the capital by storm, but for those in the know it is here to stay. While there are no dedicated Korean vegan restaurants in London yet, temple cuisine is an established part of Korean cuisine due to the introduction of Buddhism. A number of dishes are naturally vegan or can be veganised like bibimbop, pajeon and kongjang. And if you’re feeling adventurous you can even make your own kimchi.

 

Sriracha

Last month the California Department of Public Health shut down the sriracha factory for a period of 30 days. At first the residents of Irwindale, where one of the factories is based, complained about the smell and now regulators say they must comply with some dubious safety regulations, as sriracha is a raw product. Note that this product has been on the market for more than 30 years. Now fans of the red rooster chili sauce are facing an impending #srirachapocalypse. Someone, anyone tell me – have you ever known a hot sauce to go off?

 

Ms. Cupcake

Ms. Cupcake’s first book Ms. Cupcake: The Naughtiest Vegan Cakes in Town came out in May 2013. The art direction, photograph and bombproof recipes made it the highlight of any cookbook collection. If you didn’t grab yourself a copy then I implore you to do so now. In case you were wondering it’s not all cupcakes. Bakes, cookies and wonderfully inventive slices are all represented too.

 

Is 2013 the year vegan went mainstream

Or the year of the celebrity vegan? Not that I follow celebrities mind you, but they are pretty hard to ignore when they are posing naked for a PETA campaign. Nevertheless, it was hard not to notice Beyonce and Jay Z’s 22 day vegan diet. Especially when Beyonce walked into a vegan restaurant wearing some other animal’s skin. While witnessing such a scene maybe incongruous and somewhat off putting you have to remember that not everyone has embraced the vegan lifestyle, some people are transitioning and some people are on a cleanse. In all fairness they never said they were going vegan that was the media’s doing. Jay Z’s statement mentioned the words plant-based and spirituality.

Note: Al Gore also went vegan this year to very little fanfare.

 

Get more fermented foods into your life

I’m sure you already know all about probiotics, the live microorganisms that are similar to the good bacteria that reside in your gut. When your body is overflowing with good bacteria it keeps the bad bacteria at bay and makes it harder for the illness causing bacteria to take root. It’s a good job so many of these friendly bacteria-laced foods are so yummy: kombucha, sauerkraut, pickles, yogurt, miso, tempeh and my person fave kimchi.

 

We should all be feminists

“I’ve never thought it made sense to leave such a crucial thing, the ability to nourish one’s self, in the hands of others.”

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie at TEDxEuston

This 30-minute talk by one of my favorite authors is awesome so you should listen to it. The entire speech is quotable. Of course, I had to find the food quote in order to include it in this round up.

 

Horsemeat Scandal

In the winter of 2013 all hell broke lose when it was discovered that phenylbutazone laced horsemeat was being sold as beef to the unsuspecting UK supermarket consumer. As I couldn’t feign collective outrage with the rest of the cow eaters and mystery flesh eating public I just hoped the ‘crisis’ convinced a few people to go vegan.

 

Guardian link bait

I usually don’t go in for new year’s resolutions, but I’ve decided that in 2014 I’m going to spend less time surfing news sites. How can this article titled: Relax, it’s no longer weird to be a vegan be anything other than click bait? This article may have been conceived just for the pleasure of trolls, but we know the guardian can do better because last month they ran: Peak meat: is animal consumption falling out of style in the US?

 

I hope you have enjoyed this 2013 round up. It was a ton of fun to put together. Please consider forwarding it to a friend who might enjoy it. If it was forwarded to you, you can sign up right here.

And of course, if you want to talk to us about any of your catering needs just ask us.

Stay up to date with our events, recipes & menus.

 

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September Newsletter 2013

Posted on September 10th, 2013 · By admin

 

Newsletter September 2013

 

Dear Vegan Peasant Friends,

 

Figs - September Newsletter 2013

Figs – September Newsletter 2013

 

Photo, “Figs for lunch” is copyright (c) 2005 Xerones and made available under a Attribution-NonCommercial 2.0 Generic

 What’s in Season Now?

Figs

When the ancient Greeks first coined the word ambrosia they were obviously talking about figs. Ok. So, I just made that up. Everyone’s got his or her opinions, but hear me out first. If we want to get technical the etymology of the word goes back a bit further to the 1700 and 1100 BCE Vedic period in India. “Amrita the Sanskrit word is repeatedly referred to as the drink of the gods, which grants them immortality.” Whether you believe in gods or not who can forget the depictions of Adam and Eve using a fig leaf to cover their modesty. Lucky for us here on Earth, we get to enjoy one of the most delicious fruits of the summer, figs.

Figs do grow here in the UK, but mostly what you’ll find in the supermarket are the purple-black variety from Turkey. The problem with most fruit coming from abroad is that it’s picked unripe. Unlike other fruit figs won’t ripen once they are picked and will only last for two to three days when ripe. When shopping for figs make sure they are not bruised, have a deep rich color and a sweet smell.

Once you’ve eaten figs ripened straight from the tree (minus the spiders) you won’t want to go back. If you find yourself in the Mediterranean during fig season, July to October, do set aside some time in your itinerary to taste the ambrosia of the season.

Recipe concepts:

Fig & Olive Tapenade

Roasted Figs

Marinated Fig Salad

Fig & ‘Cheese’ Pasta

Baked Fig Crostini

Grilled Fig Panini

Balsamic Pickled Figs

Fig Jam

 

 FAQ: Green Wedding Tips – Part 2

 Stag and Hen Parties

If your greening up your wedding you probably wouldn’t be having a party in the style of What Happens in Vegas Stays in Vegas, popularized by a number of Hollywood movies. You wouldn’t fly to Kracow get blind drunk, leave sick and broken glass everywhere and abuse the people who live there. You wouldn’t descend on the streets of an English seaside town wearing a Mankini and or wave fake penises in the faces of passersby. I could go on, but you get the general idea. Once you get past the offensive names or the archaic concept of having a party to celebrate your ‘last night of freedom on Earth’ a pre-wedding party might not be such a bad idea.

Outfitting the wedding party

A complaint you’ll hear from time to time from the bride and members of the wedding party is ‘it’s a nice dress, but I know I’ll never wear that again’. Wedding dresses are traditional white and weddings are one of the most formal events you can attend so the clothing is intentionally made to be of the one-off variety. It doesn’t mean that it’s impossible to choose clothing that can be worn again, it’s just means that it takes a bit more thought. The best bet is to not go too formal and don’t go with white. Other ways to green up your wedding would be to pick fabrics made from hemp, bamboo or organic cotton. Wear someone else’s worn before wedding dress. Choose upcycled or vintage accessories. Use vegetable dyes on shoes. Work with a cruelty-free all natural wedding makeup artist. Donate the clothing to charity after the wedding.

Eat, drink, and be merry

Find a local vegan caterer that does wedding catering. Make selections that will be in season at the time of your wedding. Choose organic vegan wine, beer and spirits and fair trade coffee and tea. Rent real glassware, crockery, cutlery, and linens. Find out if the venue offers composting and recycling facilities. Have your cake decorated with organically grown flowers or other natural materials instead of plastic toppers. You shouldn’t have much left over food if the caterer has done their job right, but if you do, donate the leftover food to a local food bank or homeless shelter.

Help the photographer out

More than likely your photographer will ask you for a shot list. So think about the shots you would like to capture on the day and compile a list so that the photographer can check them off. Unless the photographer is a friend of both families you’ll want to appoint a person from each family to be the photo coordinator. You’ll be left with at least one thing less to worry about while you enjoy the party. Ask friends and family to share their photos with all the guests online in a free Flicker (or other photo sharing site) group that you have set up.

Events

Ears of Corn - Abbey Gardens

Ears of Corn – Abbey Gardens

Abbey Gardens – Harvest Festival

Saturday 25th September, 1pm-4pm

If you also follow us on facebook you may remember the photos from a trip we took to Abbey Gardens in West Ham. Abbey Gardens is an innovative open-access community based harvest garden on the remains of a 12th century abbey. The site came into disuse some time ago so artists Nina Pope and Karen Guthrie of Somewhere.org were commissioned to transform the site into a local community growing space.

Lydia Thornley, who runs a design consultancy in Shoreditch and is an active volunteer, asked us to cater this year’s Harvest Festival. We jumped at the opportunity to be involved in this project. The menu has been created to harvest as much produce from the garden as possible. Not only are we providing the catering, but we’ll also be one of the judges at the chutney competition. The event takes place on September 25th from 1pm to 4pm, Abbey Gardens, Bakers Row, Stratford, London E15 3NF.

We hope you’ll join us in supporting this event to mark the beginning of the festive autumn season.

 

Wedding Show

Saturday 19th October, 10am – 5pm

Coming up in October we’ll be one of a number of vendors participating in the Atelier Tammam bespoke bridal experience. Lucy Tammam has made a reputation as one of the foremost eco fashion labels. If you or a friend have been thinking about wedding catering this is a great opportunity to meet us as well as other wedding providers all in one place. The show takes place on October 19th at 5 Hastings Street, Bloomsbury, WC1H 9PZ

 

Recipe of the Month

Afghan Bouranie

This month’s recipe comes to us from our friend Sahar Razi. You may have noticed I included Afghan Bouranie at the top of the list of recipe concepts last month. We had the pleasure of eating this dish at Sahar’s place and she’s kindly forwarded me this recipe so I could share it with you. If this is the only aubergine dish you make, it’s fine as it’s the only one you’ll ever need.

This dish is delicious!

 

I hope you have enjoyed this newsletter as much as I have enjoyed writing it. Please consider forwarding it to a friend who might enjoy it. If you were forwarded it, you can sign up right here.

And of course, if you want to talk to us about how we can help you just ask us.

Stay up to date with our events, recipes & menus.

 

xD

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Afghan Bouranie

Posted on September 9th, 2013 · By admin

Afghan Bouranie
By Sahar Razi
Twitter @SaharRazi
For two people – total cooking time – over an hour.

Ingredients

3 aubergines
1 red or green pepper
2-3 large onions if you are making a larger portion – add more onion
400g tin of tomatoes
50g tomato paste
250g Greek style soy yogurt
Lebanese bread (thin and round pockets) (I cut these up into quarter triangles)
3 cloves of garlic
1 fresh chilli
1 teaspoon of salt
1 teaspoon of pepper
Sunflower oil
Olive oil
Dried mint

Method

Sauce (cooking time 25 minutes)
1. Chop the onions and then fry them with olive oil on low heat until golden and soft. Add a tin of plum tomatoes and then mash them up. Add a quarter of a tube of tomato paste and half a cup of water. Add salt, pepper and chilli.
2. Then simmer on the lowest heat for at least 20 minutes. Taste for flavour, add more salt and pepper where necessary.

Aubergine (cooking time 20 minutes)
3. Chop the washed aubergines and pepper into rounds about 2-3cm thick. Discard ends.
4. Prepare a plate with paper towels to absorb the oil.
5. Heat about one tablespoon of sunflower oil in a large frying pan over medium-high heat. Then add a sprinkling of salt (this stops the oil splattering everywhere).
6. Add one layer of aubergine. Lower the temperature. The oil will immediately absorb the aubergine. This is ok, but keep frying the aubergine until it is golden on one side. Then flip the aubergine and fry on the other side. Again add a sprinkling of salt to the aubergine. You will notice that the skin of the aubergines changes colour and also shrinks. I usually flip one more time until both sides are golden.
7. Repeat this frying process until you have fried all the aubergine. Now fry the pepper in the same way.

Casserole dish (baking time 30 minutes)
8. Use a rectangle casserole dish. Spoon some sauce on the bottom of the dish until you have covered the surface. Add a layer of aubergine. Add a layer of sauce. Repeat until you have used all the aubergine.
9. Then decoratively put the pepper on the top. Cover with foil and bake at 180 degrees Celsius for about 30 minutes. Take it out at 15 minutes and check. The sauce should be simmering. Let rest about 10 minutes before serving.

Serve
10. Mix the yogurt with the crushed garlic. Then add a sprinkle of salt. Put 3/4 of the yogurt on a platter and smooth it out all over the platter.
11. Then add all of the aubergine and sauce in sections over the platter. Put the pepper on the top again in a decorative manner. Put the remaining yogurt/garlic mix on dollops over the platter.
12. Sprinkle dried mint all over the platter.

Enjoy!

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August Newsletter 2013

Posted on August 7th, 2013 · By admin

Newsletter August 2013

 

Dear Vegan Peasant Friends,

Aubergine - August Newsletter

Aubergine

By rdesai (Flickr) [CC-BY-2.0], via Wikimedia Commons

What’s in Season Now?

Aubergine/Eggplant/Brinjal

Who doesn’t love aubergines? Well, I guess there must be someone who doesn’t like them, but that’s not me. I love aubergines and you should too. Even though I’m showcasing them in August aubergines are in season from May and will continue to be in season until October. But as with just about every type of vegetable you can get them all year round. Pick the ones that are on the smaller side, which you’ll find at your local farmers’ market. Not the ones that are approaching the size of an American football, as they will taste bitter. Medium size ones that are smooth, shiny and heavy are best. My favorite way to prepare them is to cube them, lightly salt and toss them in some olive oil and then roast them in the oven. My least favorite way is to cook them is to fry them in a pan with lots, and lots and lots of olive oil. The more oil you give them the more they soak up. As you are spending lots of time outdoors you can grill them until they blister and turn black. Nothing beats that smoky flavor. Do rotate them periodically. And once they are cooked allow them to cool down before handling.

Recipe concepts:

Bouranie Banjan (Sahar made this dish for us recently – delish)

Eggplant Parmesan

Ziti and Aubergine

Ratatouille

Moussaka

BBQ Aubergine

Baba ganoush

Aubergine in Garlic Sauce

Spicy Szechuan Aubergine

Torshi Shoor

Mirza Ghasemi

Khoresht-e Bademjan

Baingan Bharta

 

FAQ: Green Wedding Tips – Part I

We are in the middle of wedding season. Just this past weekend we provided canapés for a wedding garden party reception in Hertfordshire. Which got me thinking about all of the different ways you can green up your wedding including hiring an awesome vegan caterer.

We request the honour of your presence…

A wedding website and online wedding invitations are the easiest way to go. Unbelievable as it might seem, it’s 2013 and there are still people carrying out their daily lives without an email address. So you’ll probably have to send them a printed invitation in the mail (horror) and in that case recycled and papers that are easy to recycle, tree-free, and plantable papers with vegetable or soy-based inks are all good options.

Green Wedding Rings

The diamond ring issue is literally a minefield. So an easier option might be vintage rings either past down or an antique find. Diamonds created in a lab. Lab-created items seem to be a theme recently. Australian or Canadian mined diamonds. Or forgo the precious metals and diamonds altogether and opt for wooden bands or tattoos!

For more information visit: Fairtrade Foundation.

Location, location, location

So the guests don’t have to drive between venues and to economise and minimise on travel. Have the wedding ceremony and reception at the same venue. If this is not feasible charter a bus to chaperone the guests to each venue. This is really great for the less mobile relatives and less able-bodied guests. Last summer, we catered for the vegan, vegetarian and guests eating a gluten-free diet of a wedding party taking place on a boat at Albert Embankment. They arrived via a double-decker wedding bus just as we finished setting up.

Stage Decorations

Holding your event outdoors will necessitate the need for lots of decorations. You will probably want to make place settings for the tables so if the favors can also be part of or do double duty that’s great. Decorate with live plants, branches, fruits or berries. Make sure that the non-food plants are placed in an area that will not contaminate the food (health & safety). Opt for organic, local, and seasonal flowers if possible. Donate the flowers to a hospice charity at the end of the day.

It is more blessed to give…

As more couples are getting married later and later and have sometimes lived together for many years before the big event signing up to a registry would be a bit redundant, as they have already acquired everything they need for the home. Instead they will ask attendees to make a donation to a charity of your or their choosing. Sometimes you are not given any direction. I don’t think you can go wrong with a gift certificate to a vegan restaurant or a subscription to a green publication. And outdoor gear is always a hit with outdoorsy types.

 Events

Art direction - London Vegan Beer Festival

Art direction – London Vegan Beer Festival

London Vegan Beer Festival

On one of the hottest days of the year we drank beer. Thanks to Fat Gay Vegan and Messy Vegetarian Cook who organised the first ever London Vegan Beer Festival. The event took place on the beautiful grounds of St. Margarets House Settlement – The Gallery Café – and drew beer drinkers from all corners of London and the UK. You maybe a card-carrying member of CAMRA or you may just reach for the nearest lager every now and then. But when was the last time you attended a festival where you didn’t have to ask what’s in the beer or if the food is suitable for vegans.

Full post and more pics here

Spicy Plantain with Red Pepper Salsa - August Newsletter

Spicy Plantain with Red Pepper Salsa

Recipe of the Month

Spicy Plantain with Red Pepper Salsa

Ingredients

4 plantain cut into 1/4 inch slices

1 sweet red bell peppers diced fine

10g cilantro chopped

1 jalapeno chile minced

40ml sunflower oil

40ml seasoned rice vinegar

salt

ground pepper

 

Method

  1. Peel the plantain and cut into ¼ slices.
  2. Add to a bowl and coat with a tablespoon of sunflower oil.
  3. Place the plantain in a single layer onto a lined baking tray and into a hot oven 180C until slightly crisp.
  4. Once you take the plantain out of the oven salt to taste.
  5. To plate, place a small amount of the mixture on each plantain round and serve.

 

I hope you have enjoyed this August newsletter as much as I have enjoyed writing it.

Please consider forwarding it to a friend who might enjoy it. If you were forwarded it, you can sign up right here.

And of course, if you want to talk to us about how we can help you just ask us

 

Stay up to date with events, recipes & menus.

 

xD

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London Vegan Beer Festival

Posted on July 31st, 2013 · By admin

On one of the hottest days of the year we drank beer. Thanks to Fat Gay Vegan and Messy Vegetarian Cook who organised the first ever London Vegan Beer Festival. The event took place on the beautiful grounds of St. Marget’s House – The Gallery Café – and drew beer drinkers from all corners of London and the UK. You maybe a card-carrying member of CAMRA or you may just reach for the nearest lager every now and then. But when was the last time you attended a festival where you didn’t have to ask what’s in the beer or if the food is suitable for vegans. All the breweries at the festival only make vegan beer except Five Points, which also produce non-vegan beers. On the day we got to choose from a selection of beers provided by the following breweries: Daas, Hastings Brewery, Brass Castle Brewery, Pitfield Brewery, Brüpond Brewery, The Five Points Brewing Company, Moor Beer Company and Redchurch Brewery.

Five Points Brewing Company - London Vegan Beer Festival

Five Points Brewing Company – London Vegan Beer Festival

Moor Beer Company - London Vegan Beer Festival

Moor Beer Company – London Vegan Beer Festival

As a general rule cast conditioned beers/ales are not vegan or even vegetarian due to the fining process. Fining involves adding substances such as egg whites, isinglass, milk, blood, bentonite or gelatin to the beer during the last stage of the brewing process. These substances or agents bind to compounds in the beer, help speed up the sedimentation process and clarify the beer. However, not all beer is made using this process, Belgium and German beers are generally vegan as these countries prohibit the use of agents like isinglass and gelatin.

Redchurch Brewery London Vegan Beer Festival

Redchurch Brewery – London Vegan Beer Festival

Brüpond Brewery - London Vegan Beer Festival

Brüpond Brewery – London Vegan Beer Festival

Half of the beers on offer I’d tried before so it was great to try a few new ones. And many of the breweries are local so it’s easy to find their beer. London is having a bit of a beer renaissance at the moment with a total of 50 breweries at last count up from 32 last year. So it’s no surprise that so many of the breweries at the fest hailed from East London. Redchurch is just around the corner in Bethnal Green, Brüpond Brewery is in Leyton, Pitfield Brewery is in Essex (but use to be on Pitfield Street in N1) and Five Points Brewing Company is in Dalston.

Art direction - London Vegan Beer Festival

Art direction – London Vegan Beer Festival

 

London Vegan Beer Festival

London Vegan Beer Festival

With the explosion of the craft beer scene the London Vegan Beer Festival is well situated. By all accounts this year’s festival was a success. I’m sure they have already started the thirsty work of preparing for the next festival. I can’t wait see what Fat Gay Vegan and Messy Vegetarian have in store for the 2nd London Vegan Beer Festival.

London Vegan Beer Festival

London Vegan Beer Festival

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July Newsletter 2013

Posted on July 15th, 2013 · By admin

Newsletter July 2013

 

Dear Vegan Peasant Friends,

Courgette/zuchinni - July Newsletter

Courgette/zuchinni

Photo, “Maturating courgette/zuchinni”, is copyright (c) 2006 Meanos and made available under the public domain.

What’s in season now?

Courgette (Zucchini)

You probably hate courgettes, but you don’t have to. Perhaps, a very long time ago, a well-meaning person served you a plate of bland tasting, over boiled, thick wedged, woody and over grown courgette with no seasoning. Ok. I get you. But it’s time to give courgettes another try and besides your veg box or allotment is probably overflowing. Once you get over the initial state of shock or paralysis one might experience when one comes into a cache of courgette. Check out these ideas, as you’ll see there is no end to what you can do with courgettes.

Pickled Courgette

Baked Courgette Sticks

Courgette Fritters

Courgette Chocolate Cake

Ratatouille

Courgette Lasagne

Grilled Courgette

Spiral Sliced Courgette

Courgette & Strawberry Crumble (personal fave)

Courgette Flower Tempura

 

FAQ:

What are the best food presentation options: canapés, buffet or seated meals?

Passed canapés work well for any size group either as a champagne reception or as a starter. They are easy to hold in your hand, don’t require utensils, offer variety and are easy to serve. Keep in mind that you will need at least two to three wait staff per number of guests to pass the canapés, which may increase your staff estimate.

Buffet style allows your guests a variety of menu choices, which they get to pick or choose or try them all. Servers are required at each station. This is a great choice for the budget conscious.

Seated Meal There are a number of options for seated meals: family style or plated. For family style, your guests are presented with smaller platters of food, which are shared among groups of 4-8. At a plated meal, our wait staff serve plated courses to individual diners. Plated dinners require the most staff (ratio of servers to guests is 1:8).

 

Events

 

Umeshu - July Newsletter

Umeshu

Underground Japanese Osaka Festival Dinner

Vegan Ronin presents:

Vegan Ronin Underground Supper Club

Before we arrived I knew we were in for a treat. I’d been trying to get to the Vegan Ronin Japanese Supper Club for ages. If it wasn’t one thing, it was something else and before you knew it all the places would have sold out. But not this time, even before the event had gone live, I was on the case. Pestering Jhenn aka The Vegan Ronin via twitter to get the 411.

[Click to continue…]

 

Maitreya Social – Restaurant Review

Is a restaurant and arts space from chef Barney McGrath, who has taken over from former chef/proprietor Mark Evans. Maitreya Social or the former Café Maitreya has always been placed in the top 5 or 10 must visit veggie restaurants in the UK. Since we were in Bristol for the VegFest anyway we decided to check it out.

 [Click to continue…]

 

Recipe of the Month

Garden Burger

As we are now in the middle of the picnic/bbq season here’s an oldie, but a goodie from VegNews. You really can’t go wrong with the Garden Burger. This recipe even includes the humble ingredient millet and I’m sure you’ve been wondering what to do with the rest of the bag you have stashed at the back of the cupboard. If it hasn’t gone off yet put it in here.

Ingredients

1-1/2 cups filtered water

1/3 cup each millet and quinoa, rinsed and drained

1/2 teaspoon sea salt

1/2 teaspoon each dried basil, oregano and thyme

1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

2/3 cup red onion, finely diced

1 tablespoon olive oil, plus additional for oiling cookie sheet

1/3 cup each carrot, celery and red pepper, finely diced

1 tablespoon garlic, minced

1 cup spinach, triple washed, patted dry, and roughly chopped

1/2 cup each raw almonds, pumpkin seeds and sunflower seeds, roughly chopped

3 tablespoons brown rice flour

2 tablespoons tamari

2 tablespoons freshly chopped parsley

1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar

1 teaspoon hot pepper sauce

Cornmeal, for dusting

 

Method

  1. Bring water to a boil in a medium saucepan. Add the millet, quinoa and seasonings, cover, reduce heat to low and simmer for 15 to 20 minutes or until all of the water has been absorbed. Remove from the heat and set aside to cool.
  2. In a large skillet, sauté the onion in olive oil for 2 minutes. Add the carrot, celery and red pepper, and sauté an additional 5 minutes. Add the garlic and sauté an additional 1 minute. Remove the skillet from heat.
  3. Place the grains in a medium bowl. Add the sautéed vegetable mixture and all of the remaining ingredients (except the cornmeal), and stir well to combine.
  4. Place some cornmeal on a small plate. Portion mixture into patties and dust all sides with cornmeal. Pan fry for 20 to 25 minutes or until lightly browned.

 

I hope you have enjoyed this July newsletter as much as I have enjoyed writing it. Please consider forwarding it to a friend who might enjoy it. If you were forwarded it, you can sign up right here.

And of course, if you want to talk to us about how we can help you just ask us
Stay up to date with our events, recipes & menus.

xD

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Vegan Ronin Underground Supper Club

Posted on July 15th, 2013 · By admin

Vegan Ronin presents:

Vegan Ronin Underground Supper Club

Before we arrived I knew we were in for a treat. I’d been trying to get to the Vegan Ronin Japanese Supper Club for ages. If it wasn’t one thing, it was something else and before you knew it all the places would have sold out. But not this time, even before the event had gone live, I was on the case pestering Jhenn aka The Vegan Ronin via twitter to get the 411.

On a Tuesday evening in June we made our way to Barnet. At first we planned to cycle all the way there, but the weather had been so iffy and we figured that we’d be so ravenous that we’d forget our manners and the guests would think we were weird. So we cycled to Camden Town and took the train the rest of the way.

When we arrived one guest was already there and a couple arrived shortly after us. Jhenn and Ed, who was also hosting and cooking, offered us a number of drinks. I chose the umeshu, Jhenn’s homemade plum wine to start. What an amazing scent and refreshing taste… I vowed to try making some myself. While we waited for the last guest to arrive we seated ourselves at the table that opened onto the garden. We felt so lucky to experience dinning al fresco as the weather had been so crappy as of late. We began to speculate about what had happened to the remaining guest as he did not call, text or tweet. While we chatted we polished off the edamame and continued to imbibe. It wasn’t long before the gyoza were served and the last guest arrived. It was lucky for him as we would have gladly polished off this plateful of loveliness without him, just kidding.

 

Gyoza

Gyoza

 

Yakitori

Yakitori

Okonomiyaki

Okonomiyaki

After the gyoza, we tucked into a plate of yakitori, grilled “chicken” with teriyaki glaze (I must say creatively making use of Fry’s Pops); potato sarada which reminded me of an American-German style potato salad that has the addition of pickle or sweet relish; and inari zushi, sweet tofu pockets. This was a meal all by itself, but Jhenn and Ed didn’t stop there. The okonomiyaki, cabbage savoury pancakes, were a real treat. There is Abento in Covent Garden and the street food stall  and residency in Clapton by Sho Foo Doh that specialise in making this dish, but neither offer a vegan option. My favourite dish was the takayaki, octopus-less konnyaku balls. Last year, I saw a lady making these at #R3D Market; I was memerised by her agile handiwork as she turned out these orbs of spherical perfection. Traditionally, this street food is filled with diced octopus and served with pickled ginger and spring onions. Takayaki are very tricky to make so props again to Jhenn and Ed. They got me thinking about so many delicious ways this dish could be appropriated. I’m gonna have to spring for a special takoyaki pan now. For dessert, we had ohagi, sweet bean and rice balls; maha keki, green tea steamed cake; daigaku imo, candied sweet potatoes; organic ichigo strawberries; and mugicha, barley tea.

Ohagi

Ohagi

If you have not made your way to the The Vegan Ronin Supper Club, what are you waiting for?

The Lovely Jhenn

The Lovely Jhenn

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Maitreya Social

Posted on July 12th, 2013 · By admin

Samphire Fritters- Maitreya Social

Samphire Fritters- Maitreya Social

Is a restaurant and arts space from chef Barney McGrath, who has taken over from former chef/proprietor Mark Evans. Maitreya Social or the former Café Maitreya has always been placed in the top 5 or 10 must visit veggie restaurants in the UK. Since we were in Bristol for the VegFest anyway we decided to check it out.

I made reservations, a few weeks ago, as the website states: “Its always best to book a table in the evening as we are often full.”

Once we arrived, I didn’t get the sense we needed reservations anyway.

Waiting at the bar, sipping cocktails until a table became available might have been nice. Within two minutes a friendly server appeared and whisked us to the upstairs dinning area on the far right next to the empty wine bottle and light display.

The place has a comfy vibe and looks like a house that has been converted into a restaurant not unlike buildings you might find in some areas of San Francisco or Brighton. As it’s also an art space the quirkiness extends to the work hanging on the walls and the vibrant furniture installation placed next to the door of the upstairs dinning room. We were seated at the only other table for two with the rest being larger tables of four or more. At one particular table, full of social workers, you could tell they had been coming here for years.

The menu is small – all items fit on one page. I find it kind of scary dinning at a restaurant where they hand you a book for the menu. So small is good. The menu is seasonal with a few nods to the Mediterranean, Middle East and Asia and a number of vegan and gluten free options. Beetroot appears on the menu as a starter and as a side dish. Reminding you that seasonal and local are not just buzz words. The wine menu is also compact. Nevertheless, they managed to squeeze in an English white: Davenport Vineyards Horsmonden Dry, 2010 England described as ‘light, vibrant and super-fresh with a touch of citrus fruit’. Moderation is the key word here with no bottles priced over £30 and most well below that.

To start we had olives served in a ramekin with a soft white bap. And a deep-fried, tempura battered, ladder lattice of samphire sitting on a bed of slightly pickled carrot, red onion and cabbage accompanied by an equally delicious zingy tri-colour dressing. Instead of taking copious photos, I’d advise you to eat this dish fairly quickly – while it’s still hot. To drink we decided to play it safe and order the IGT Sicilia Mont’albano Nero d’Avola, 2010 Italy. On the other hand if you order the Roasted Shallot, Chestnut and Chestnut Mushroom Bourguignon I suggest you eat it slowly as it’s piping hot due to the fact that it’s served in a Mauviel Copper Mini Sauteuse with mini polenta cakes and broccoli crowns. The vegan option comes without the cheese, but the polenta and broccoli seemed orphaned. Perhaps adding another ingredient, not a fake cheese, might bring it together. Chef Barney’s take on a Laksa consisted of Cauliflower, Coconut and Tamarind with steamed rice pancake rolls and spinach and cashew dumplings. I would have liked a bit of heat to accompany this dish, but even without the heat it was flavourful and inventive. For dessert, we had the Pistachio, Almond & Vanilla Baklava. Of all the dishes we ordered I’d have to say this one missed the mark. The chocolate and passion fruit sauce clashed and the texture of the baklava were a bit chewy.

Maitreya Social is the kind of place where you’ll immediately feel comfortable, whether you’re a local, regular or just a visitor. If you are in Bristol it’s the place to go for friendly service and a compact menu of generous vegetarian comfort food.

Location: Maitreya Social, 89 St Mark’s Road, Easton, Bristol, BS5 6HY, 0117 951 0100 http://www.cafemaitreya.co.uk/

Prices: Starters, £4 to £5; Mains, £9 to £10; Extras, £2 to £4; Desserts, £5; Wine £13 to £30.

Details: Open 6 p.m. to 11:30 p.m. Tuesday to Thursday, 10 a.m. to 11:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday, Closed Monday.

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